Are Badly Written Proposals Losing You Business?

Listen or read — your choice.

I attended a luncheon of the Legal Marketing Association, at which a panel of corporate users of legal services talked about how they choose law firms for their work. Naturally, their views were of great interest to the law firm marketers in attendance.

And it was an eye-opener.

As a communications expert (and fanatic!) I was happy to receive support for my insistence on the value of good writing. One Corporate Counsel said it drove him crazy to receive pitches full of grammatical errors and poor writing. When asked if that might even make him decide against a firm, he was quite emphatic that it would.

And it stands to reason, doesn’t it? If a law firm can’t even write a proposal that’s not at least grammatically correct, why would a company entrust it with work that is largely based on the written word?

Make Your Words Count: a short painless guide to business writing for accountantsThe same applies to accountants, who tend to fall back on the old “we’re about numbers, not words” excuse — and yes, it is an excuse. That’s why I wrote my most recent book, Make Your Words Count: a short painless guide to business writing for accountants, which is available on Amazon in both print and Kindle editions.

And yes, I do plan a short painless guide to business writing for lawyers — probably later this year. Stay tuned.

I’ll report on some other comments from the LMA luncheon in the coming weeks, but in the meantime, maybe you should take a closer look at those corporate proposals you’re working on. Do they showcase your firm’s competence for the job — or do they make you look unprepared and even sloppy?

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Writing Website Articles: 3 Simple Formulas to Write Articles Your Visitors Will Love

Read or listen — your choice.

writing website articlesLast week I wrote about the importance of having articles on your website. Many professional services providers understand the value of articles, but they’re stuck on the problem of what to write about and how to write their articles.

One of the easiest ways to tackle any writing project is to use a formula. When I tell people that they often push back, because they don’t want their writing to be formulaic. But that should never stop you using a formula, because if you write it well nobody will even notice it is a formula!

If you stop to think about it, even popular fiction is written to formula: the detective novel opens with a chapter that sets the scene and introduces the main characters; the murder is discovered; the detective comes on the scene and starts detecting; we start to have our own ideas as to “whodunnit”; two-thirds of the way through the book there’s a second murder (this is mandatory!) and eventually all is revealed in the last chapter.

When you read one of these books, do you even notice the formula? No, because you’re too busy getting involved in the story. So set aside your worries about the formula approach to articles and let’s look at three article formulas you can use.

1.  The List Article

People love lists. Maybe it’s because they can see right away how long the list is and how much time it will take them to read the article. The beauty of the list article is that you can put it together in any order, because the items don’t need to be in any particular order. So you might write about…

• 10 tips for designing a “green” home
• 7 ways to get the best price when you sell your business
• 3 sure signs your business is ready to go public

Depending on your profession and your clientele, decide what you want them to know and break it into a numbered list. Then just write each point in a short, pithy paragraph and voila — your article is done.

2.  The How To Article

“How to” is one of the most searched phrases on the Internet. When people want to know how to do something today, they go online to look for articles, videos, webinars and anything else that will give them the instructions they want.

Again, the topic depends on your desired audience.

• How to write your will so that your wealth goes where you want it to go when you die
• How to list and sell your own home without an agent
• How to pay less tax on your business income

Imagine you are sitting in a coffee shop with one of your clients, and he or she asks you a question. How would you answer it in that informal setting? Put that in writing and there’s your article.

3.  The Mistakes Article

This is a variation on the list, but it focuses on the mistakes your clients might make and how to avoid them.

• 5 common mistakes accountants make on their websites and how to avoid them (I actually have a speech I give to accounting groups on this very topic — drop me a line if you’d like me to deliver it to your group.)
• The one mistake you must not make if you want to win your insurance claim
• Common mistakes that will cause you to pay twice as much tax as you need to

This one is a little more tricky because you are focusing on the negative, but it can be very effective when done well because people often recognize their own mistakes!

So if you’ve been wanting to write articles to attract visitors to your website but were suffering writer’s block, try using one of these formulas. Just pour your content in like jelly in a mould, and you’ll be surprised how easy it is. Happy writing!

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Professional Services Marketing: why should you have articles on your website?

Listen or read — your choice.

professional services websiteAn effective website is an essential tool in marketing your professional services. But what are your website visitors really looking for? I asked that question of a random group of business owners recently in connection with how they found their accountants. Here’s what they told me.

Whether they find the website in an online search (very few in this group did) or through a personal referral (the most popular), they are looking for evidence that this is the firm for them. That comes through two factors: the “personality” of the firm and illustration of subject matter expertise.

Ironically, both these factors are conspicuous by their absence in many professional services websites, yet they’re both so easy to include.

First, the personality. The look and feel of the site, as well as the tone of the words, should reflect the culture of your firm. Is it a friendly, family-style small practice? Is it a highly structured larger firm with many experts on different subjects? Is it international in scope and attitude? All of these can and should be reflected in the site.

I recently visited the website of a firm whose name was the name of a person, and yet nowhere on the site was there any information about who that person was — or anyone else in the firm for that matter. That’s a conflicting signal that raises a red flag for me.

Demonstrating your expertise can be easily done by including a section of helpful articles. Think of the questions your clients most often ask and put your answers in the form of brief, jargon-free, easy-to-understand articles. Once you build up a collection of these articles on your site, visitors will instinctively place more trust in your expertise.

And article titles and topics are an excellent place to use keywords that actually will attract online visitors. While people don’t often search for “the best employment lawyer in town”, they will use a search engine to look for information on “can I sue my employer for firing me?”. If you have an article on the very subject they are researching, you’ll automatically climb a few rungs up the ladder of professional credibility. This is how SEO works best for professional services marketing.

Need help writing your articles? Drop me a line at helen@helenwilkie.com and let’s talk about how I can help.

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2 Inexpensive (or Free) Items to Help You Make Your Own Videos

Listen or read — your choice.

Use iPhone for videoA couple of people have recently asked me about making their own videos for use on their websites. The question was about whether you need to buy expensive equipment to get good quality.

In a nutshell, the answer is no! There are several fine quality video cameras on the market for a few hundred dollars, but to be honest, the video quality on your iPhone or other smart phone is good enough for this purpose. That’s what I’ve been using myself for the past couple of years.

Now if you have someone to assist you with this, it’s obviously easier, but what it if you shoot your own videos? Again, I can speak from experience here because I shoot my own, using my iPhone.

“But how do you hold it in place?” I hear you ask. Simple.

use Swivl for videoI purchased a little gizmo called Swivl (find it at Swivl.com). You simply put your iPhone or Android into the Swivl, attach the separate sensor to your pocket or belt (or just hold it in your hand), and as you walk from side to side the whole thing swivels round and follows you! How cool is that?

I bought it so that I could record my presentations from the platform, and it’s great for that. But I’ve actually used it more for shooting video in my office. For that, I just attach the Swivl to my tripod, insert the iPhone, set it to video and I’m good to go.

When you shoot video with your phone, just make sure your lighting is acceptable (no unflattering shadows) and the sound is good. The build-in mic in the iPhone (and, I imagine, other phones) does a perfectly acceptable job if you’re standing just a yard or two from the phone.

TeleprompterIf you’re nervous about remembering what you want to say, here’s another easy solution. And it’s free! It’s a teleprompter.

Now you might think of teleprompters as high-end equipment used by television crews, but like a lot of other technology it’s now available for users like us. I found a whole selection of free teleprompter apps for my iPad. I tried a couple of them, and both were just fine.

Now, there might be a problem holding the iPad in place while you’re making your video if you don’t have someone to hold it for you. If that’s your situation, you might prefer to set up a teleprompter on your computer. There’s a free online teleprompter at CuePrompter.com and it works like a charm. Just type in your script, hit the button and it starts. You can even set the scrolling speed to suit your needs.

So there you have a simple set-up you can use to record your own videos right there in your office. No excuses accepted now — get it done!

By the way, I was interviewed by professional videographer Janine Harris about content syndication and using video as part of it. You might find it useful to watch the interview (and yes, this was shot in a professional studio).

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The Easiest Marketing You Can Do that So Many Professionals Don’t

Listen or read — your choice.

One of the easiest ways of marketing your professional services is one that way too many professionals don’t do. If you’re not doing it now, it only takes a tweak in your current behavior to start. And if you’re not doing it now, you are leaving money on the table.

I’ll tell you what it is in a minute, but first let me give you an analogy.

You probably know me as a marketing copywriter working with professional services firms, but what you may not know is that there is another side to me and my business. I have been a professional keynote speaker and trainer on communication at work since 1993. In the speaking business, there is a truism that says if you want to get more bookings, do two things:

1.    Get really good on the platform
2.    Be easy to get along with

(OK, it helps if you make them laugh too, but that’s not applicable here!) In other words, become really good at the craft of your profession, and act with clients in such a way that they enjoy doing business with you.

And that’s it. That’s the secret, easy marketing I want to share with you. Apply it to your business as an accountant, a lawyer, a consultant, an architect or whatever profession you practice.

The medical profession has its Hippocratic Oath, which says “First, do no harm.” The same could apply to any profession, but it needs to go further than that. You must not only do no harm, but if you want to grow your business you must do a great deal of good for your clients. Go the extra mile to do a great job for them so that they are 100% confident in you.

I don’t know if you’ve ever had to spend any time in hospital, but my husband did a few years ago and I became very familiar with the hospital world. I can tell you I met some big-shot surgeons who had the worst bedside manner you could imagine! Now granted, given their in-demand specialized skills, they didn’t have to rely on word of mouth to get patients on the operating table, and that’s just as well because nobody would have worked with them voluntarily.

How do you treat your clients on a personal, human level? Do you answer their phone calls in a reasonable length of time? (So easy to do, so rarely done.) Do you answer their questions in a language they can understand, or in jargon-laden explanations that leave them none the wiser?

People talk, you know. Most people find their professional advisors by referral from a trusted source. Those trusted referrers could be your clients — but they’re sure not going to recommend you if you’re a pain in the neck to deal with.

Disney has always been held up as a shining example of how doing what they do well is how they market their theme parks, because people rave about the great experience to their friends. Take a lesson from Disney.

When you think about marketing your professional services, think about how well you’re doing on these two incredibly easy ways of encouraging referrals and recommendations. It’s the proverbial low-hanging fruit of marketing — don’t leave it on the tree!

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Let Your Newsletter or Blog Speak with Your Voice

Listen or read — your choice.

write in your own voiceIf you publish a newsletter or blog as a tool in the marketing of your professional services, it’s important to let it speak with your voice. What does that mean?

Some people can have a perfectly normal voice when they are in a business conversation, but as soon as they sit down in front of their computer keyboard to write — that voice changes into some ultra-formal “business-like” lecture! That’s not good, because people don’t want to be lectured and they won’t read your message.

Over the years, people who know me personally have often paid me the compliment of saying that when they read my blog they can almost hear me speak. That’s because I write the same way, in the same voice, as I use in conversation.

You may have read my recent posts about my new service, The 90-Minute Author, which has presented me with an interesting challenge. That’s because in editing the transcripts of the interviews, I need to polish the wording and make sure the grammar is correct — but without taking away the author’s voice. After all, this is not my book — it’s the author’s book, and it has to speak in that person’s voice.

So how do you make sure your own voice comes through in your writing? The best way is so simple it’s surprising more people don’t do it: speak the message and type the words as you say them.

Now that is easy for me because I have been speaking professionally for many years, so my own voice is well developed and ingrained in my messages. So if I’m writing an article on a subject I speak on, I simply write what I would say to the audience on that topic. That’s how I wrote my last book.

For several years I have specialized in teaching business writing skills to accountants and lawyers. Although I haven’t written the lawyer version yet, my latest book (my sixth) is Make Your Words Count: a short painless guide to business writing for accountants. That book is really a version of the full-length workshop I teach on the subject. I actually spoke it out loud the way I usually deliver the workshop and wrote the words as they came out of my mouth! Now of course I had to edit and polish it a bit afterwards, but essentially that’s what it was. People who have taken my workshops have said to me, “I loved the book. It was just as I remembered it from your workshop.” That’s because the book was written in my voice.

Now maybe public speaking is not something you do — although I do recommend it as part of your marketing mix — but you can still use this process. After you’ve decided the topic for your blog post or your newsletter issue, imagine a friend or a client asked you a question about it. Now immediately answer the question out loud and type the words as they come out of your mouth. You may stutter and stammer and repeat yourself a bit, but that’s OK. Just put all the words in, and then edit it afterwards to make it flow smoothly. But don’t edit out your voice — because that’s what makes the message uniquely yours, and that’s what your readers want.

By the way, visit HelenWilkie.com to learn how you can quickly and easily become the author of a book that most certainly speaks with your voice.

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But You Still Have to Write the Darn Book!

Listen or read — your choice

write a bookToday I listened to a webinar conducted by Guy Kawasaki, the famed speaker, writer and former “chief evangelist” of Apple. He has written a number of books, and after the many trials encountered in publishing the traditional way, he now espouses self-publishing. But it’s traditional self-publishing – you still have to write the book.

American journalist and author Gene Fowler had it right when he said, “Writing is easy. All you do is stare at a blank sheet of paper until drops of blood form on your forehead.” And he did it for a living, so just imagine how it is for the rest of us!

I have nothing against Kawasaki’s advice to go the self-publishing route, but the trouble is you still have to write the darn book! I’ve written seven books, and even though they have all done great things for my business, I don’t much fancy writing another one — at least not the traditional way. It just takes too much time and work, not to mention dealing with editors and designers and printers and so on and so on.

And my clients, who are mainly accountants, lawyers, consultants and other professional service providers, sure don’t have time to write books. But they all recognize the business value they would get out of being an author. So that’s why I created The 90-Minute Author program. 90-Minute Authors don’t write a word. They simply sit back to be interviewed by me, by phone or Skype, for approximately 90 minutes (what a coincidence!), and then leave the rest to me.

And it only takes about a month for them to have books in hand, all at a fraction of the cost of hiring a ghostwriter.

If you want to be the author of a tightly focused book on a single area of your expertise, why not become a 90-Minute Author? I invite you to visit my site and read all about the program. Then drop me a line by email if you have questions or would like to explore the possibilities. It’s a no-brainer really. Let’s talk soon and get your wisdom into print.

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Professional Services Marketing: Your Website May Be Stylish, but Is It Effective?

Listen or read — your choice.

effective websitesIn websites, as in fashion, styles change. Even though the Internet is still quite young in the grand scheme of things, you can still spot an “old school” site that was designed back at the turn of the century and hasn’t been updated since. You don’t want that, because it gives the impression that you and your business are behind the times.

But just like in the fashion world, not all styles will suit everyone. No matter how “cool” a new fashion style may be, I’m not going to wear it if it does nothing for me. I believe the same criterion should apply to website styles.

I’ve recently noticed a trend towards sites with very deep graphic headers, often almost filling up the screen and leaving only a small space at the bottom where the copy begins. So the visitor has to scroll down to see the (hopefully) compelling headline and message that speaks to the target client. That’s equivalent to the old newspaper term “beneath the fold”. Newspapers are folded to fit in vending boxes and people’s mailboxes, and every good newspaper editor knows the big headlines and the important stories go “above the fold”.

The same applies to websites. People’s attention span on the web is notoriously short, and if you make them scroll down to find out what you want them to know about your services … well they just won’t.

I’ve nothing against pretty pictures (sorry, I meant “compelling visuals”!), but when they take over the whole screen to the exclusion of your essential marketing message, that’s just not good business.

How does  your professional website measure up? If it’s not getting the results you want, perhaps you need an expert marketing eye to diagnose the problem and recommend ways to fix it. If that sounds like you, I invite you to visit my site to find out about my website content audit service. Then contact me for your free website consultation and review. Your website should be a working tool for your business — let’s get it working for you!

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81% of Americans Want to Write a Book. Should You?

Listen or read — your choice.


In a recent article in the Huffington Post, author BJ Gallagher talks about how writing her book turbo-charged her business. She cites the statistic that 81% of Americans want to write a book, and although most of them never will, Gallagher advises consultants and other professionals, “Write a book. It gives you instant credibility; it makes you an expert, even if you don’t have a Ph.D.”

I totally agree with her, and I give the same advice to my clients, and even my colleagues. I’ve written six books of my own, and I can attest to their positive effects on my business.

I would also add this advice: you don’t necessarily need to write a big book. Today, people are time-pressed and when it comes to non-fiction books they prefer to read just what they want to know about a subject. A slim, tightly focused volume is just right for that.

Gallagher does, however, offer this traditional advice I don’t necessarily agree with: “Don’t know how to write well, or don’t have time? No problem. That’s what ghostwriters are for. Many of the best-known CEO authors — and even many well-published business gurus — have ghostwriters do the heavy lifting.”

That may be true, but ghostwriters cost a lot of money — often $50,000 and up. The ghostwriting process can also be time-consuming. But if you are convinced of the value of authorship but don’t have the money or time to go the ghostwriting route, I have a better way for you. It’s my own service called The 90-Minute Author. 90 minutes? Yes, that’s the amount of time you invest, and I take care of the rest.

With traditional publishing, it can take up to two years before you are holding your book in your hand. But with The 90-Minute Author, you’ll have it in about a month.

As BJ Gallagher says, “Not all of those 81% of Americans who want to write a book have a story worth telling, but if you’re a business owner, you do.” Whether you are in America or anywhere else, if you are a business owner or professional, being an author can do wonders for your business. I invite you to read more about The 90-Minute Author, and then call me to set up your free phone call to explore whether it’s for you.

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Webinars: the good, the bad, the ugly

Listen or read — your choice.

Webinars can be an excellent way to market your professional services, but only if you do them right. They can leave your clients and prospects wanting more, or they can leave them yawning and bored, or annoyed and frustrated.

Some would argue that there’s no right and wrong way to do webinars, but based on my own experience as a participant in webinars, there are certainly some habits to avoid and some to cultivate. Let’s look at a few.

The introduction: who am I and why should you listen to me?

This is a common way to begin, particularly when it’s an interview webinar. There’s nothing wrong with it, except that too often it lasts too long, rambles on and comes across as self-praise. I’m often looking at the clock and seeing the webinar started ten minutes ago and we still haven’t got to the content.

Instead, in your promotion of the webinar, give a brief description of your expertise (less if the promo is on your own website as it will be available anyway). Then give the two-minute version at the start of your webinar.

Here’s what we’ll cover

People like to know what’s on the agenda and a brief rundown is acceptable. But don’t tell the audience repeatedly how much valuable content you have for them. They’ll be the judge of that.

They can read!

There’s an unfortunate trend in webinars today to put up a PowerPoint slide and read exactly what it says. It originated with people who have long form sales letters on their sites, and now they are supplementing the page with this “video sales letter” on top. It may well work in selling certain services or products, but it doesn’t work when you are teaching people something or providing actionable information.

Treat it as you would a training program. Put up slides that support what you are saying, but don’t put up a script that they could read.

Give them real information

Even if  you’re not charging money, audience members are still paying with their time. So respect it, and don’t give them a thinly disguised sales pitch for your services. Sometimes professionals are afraid that if they teach people what to do they won’t need their services, but nothing could be further from the truth. They still need a lawyer when they want to sell their house and they still need an accountant to solve their complex tax problems. The difference is that now they are more informed and ready to have an intelligent conversation with you on the subject.

And even if they don’t need your services now, when they do need them you will be the expert who comes to mind because you have helped them already through your webinar.

It’s perfectly acceptable to remind them at the end that you provide a service to help them with the issue you’ve been covering, but keep it professional. There are too many hucksters out there using webinars like the medicine peddlers of the old west. You don’t want to come across that way, so keep it professional and it will pay off for you.

Need help in putting your webinar content together, or creating supportive PowerPoint or Keynote slides? Give me a call and let’s explore how I can help.

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